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Faculty in the News, Sept. 20

NOTE: Faculty, if you are interviewed and quoted by news media, or if your work has been cited, and you have an online link to the article or video, please let us know. Contact us at news@csusb.edu  


CSUSB professor emerita quoted on benefit of college education for formerly incarcerated individuals
KQED (San Francisco)
Sept. 20, 2019
 
An article about Cal State Los Angeles’ Prison Graduation Initiative, the state’s only public B.A. program that sends professors to teach in state prisons, included a quote from Carolyn Eggleston, Cal State San Bernardino professor emerita of education, and co-founder of the Center for the Study of Correctional Education.
 
“There was an understanding that postsecondary education is one of the few things that really gives people enough skill to make a decent living when they get out,” said Eggleston.
 
Read the complete article at “A college education in prison opens unexpected path to freedom.”

CSUSB physics professor co-authors study on how comets arrive and are funneled to inner solar system
SpaceRef
Sept. 19, 2019
 
Laura Woodney, CSUSB professor of physics, was listed as one of the co-authors of a study led by a University of Central Florida researcher that may fundamentally alter our understanding of how comets arrive from the outskirts of the solar system and are funneled to the inner solar system coming closer to Earth.
 
In a study to be published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters this week, scientist Gal Sarid and co-authors describe the discovery of an orbital “gateway” through which many comets pass before they approach our sun. The gateway was uncovered as part of a simulation of centaurs, small icy bodies traveling on chaotic orbits between Jupiter and Neptune. The study team modeled the evolution of bodies from beyond Neptune’s orbit, through the giant planet’s region, and inside Jupiter’s orbit. These icy bodies are considered nearly pristine remnants of material from the birth of our solar system.
 
Along with Sarid and Woodney, the other co-authors of the study are: Kathryn Volk (Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona), Jordan Steckloff (Planetary Science Institute and University of Texas at Austin), and Walter Harris (Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona).
 
Read the complete article at “Comet gateway discovered to inner solar system, may alter fundamental understanding of comet evolution.”

Designation of antifa as domestic terrorist organization may infringe on civil liberties, CSUSB professor says
San Antonio (Texas) Express-News
Sept. 19, 2019
 
Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, was quoted in an editorial about anti-fascist counter protesters, also known as antifa, who confront far-right extremists. The editorial contends that such tactics are counter-productive and can make far-right extremists seem like victims; one case, a U.S. Senate resolution proposed to label antifa as a “domestic terrorist organization.”
 
Levin said the designation could extend to other protest groups. “There is a real violent sliver of antifa,” he said. “However, I am more or as concerned with the potential civil liberties incursions made on the grounds of proclaiming antifa as some carte blanche check to investigate otherwise peaceful yet maybe boisterous groups.”
 
Read the complete editorial at “Focus on antifa distracts from real threat.”

These news clips and others may be found at “In the Headlines” at inside.csusb.edu.
 


TAGS:Carolyn Eggleston, education, College of Education, Center for the Study of Correctional Education, Cal State Los Angeles, Prison Graduation Initiative, Laura Woodney, physics, College of Natural Sciences, study, astronomy, comets, solar system, Brian Levin, criminal justice, research, Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, hate crime, antifa, far right extremists, domestic terrorist, civil liberties, Top Stories

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