We Define the Future

Faculty in the News, Sept. 11

NOTE: Faculty, if you are interviewed and quoted by news media, or if your work has been cited, and you have an online link to the article or video, please let us know. Contact us at news@csusb.edu  


CSUSB Professor Brian Levin testifies before Congressional committee on global and domestic terrorism
Homeland.House.gov
Sept. 10, 2019
 
Brian Levin, professor of criminal justice and director of Cal State San Bernardino’s Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism testified Tuesday, Sept. 10, before the House of Representatives Committee on Homeland Security to discuss the center’s latest findings on extremist threats to the U.S. 

He was joined by journalist Peter Bergen, who is also vice president for global studies and fellows at New America; former FBI agent Ali Soufan, now the CEO of the Soufan Group; and Thomas Joscelyn, senior fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies.
 
The hearing was streamed live, and is also archived, at “Global Terrorism: Threats to the Homeland, Part I.”

CSUSB professor testifies before House Committee on Homeland Security
Inland News Today
Sept. 10, 2019
 
Brian Levin, professor of criminal justice and director of Cal State San Bernardino’s Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, testified before the House of Representatives Committee on Homeland Security Tuesday, Sept. 10, to discuss the center’s latest findings on extremist threats to the U.S.

Levin’s conclusion is that it’s coming from within the country.

“White supremacist/far right extremists are now, the most ascendant transnational terror threat facing the homeland,” Levin said in his opening remarks.
 
Read the complete article at “Domestic terror threat to the U.S. studied.”

CSUSB professor offers advice on dealing with loneliness
Architectural Digest
Sept. 10, 2019
 
Kelly Campbell, professor of psychology at California State University, San Bernardino and a nationally recognized expert on relationships, was interviewed for an article on “how to combat loneliness when you finally live alone.”
 
“People have always been lonely, but there is greater awareness of it today. What used to be private is now public, so people learn and talk about these issues much more than they did in the past,” Campbell said. “Another thing to keep in mind is that there are now more single households than ever before, and a key predictor of happiness and life satisfaction is social connection.”
 
Campbell recommends focusing on the positives of being alone, like finding time for self-care, reflection, and hobbies. She prioritizes in-person relationships, and advises an “active” use of social media to keep in touch with friends. She also thinks it’s wise to set limits around technology to keep from playing the comparison game, and to push yourself to meet new, like-minded people in clubs or at events. And lastly, she notes that if the loneliness is prolonged or deepens into depression, then it’s a good idea to seek therapy.
 
“For some people it might be a quick fix, and for others, it may be a lifelong trait,” she says. “Loneliness can ebb and flow depending on what’s going on in a person’s life, but if loneliness persists for years, then a long-term approach is needed.”
 
Read the complete article at “How to combat loneliness when you finally live alone.”

These news clips and others may be found at “In the Headlines” at inside.csusb.edu.
 


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