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Faculty in the News, Nov. 6

NOTE: Faculty, if you are interviewed and quoted by news media, or if your work has been cited, and you have an online link to the article or video, please let us know. Contact us at news@csusb.edu.


CSUSB professor interviewed about latest sanctions placed on Iran by Trump administration
PressTV
Nov. 5, 2019

David Yaghoubian, CSUSB professor of history, appeared on PressTV to discuss the latest round of sanctions placed on Iran by the Trump administration – this time nine individuals and one entity linked to Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei and/or Iranian armed forces.

“To just cut to the chase, the United States can place its cruel and illegal sanctions on every last man, woman, child, object, and entity in the Islamic Republic of Iran and this is not going to bring about the desired fealty or subservience to American and Israeli foreign policy goals and regional interests,” Yaghoubian said during the interview. “And so I believe that the recent statements by Ayatollah Khamenei regarding the inability to negotiate with the United States and the importance of Iran pursuing its strategic diplomacy and as well bolstering its resistance economy are pragmatic and logical.”

Watch the complete video at "Iran: Empty sanctions show US desperation."

Report by CSUSB’s Institute of Applied Research shows good news
Fontana Herald News
Nov. 5, 2019

A new report by the Institute of Applied Research at Cal State San Bernardino contained generally good news for the Inland Empire economy.

“The October Inland Empire Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) increased to 54.0 in October from September’s 49.7,” said Barbara Sirotnik, CSUSB professor of information & decision sciences and director of the Institute of Applied Research, and Lori Aldana, project coordinator of the Institute of Applied Research, in the Inland Empire Report on Business for November.

“For the past few months, the local PMI has shown a great deal of variability: it was 46.3 in June, 55.0 in July, 50.0 in August, 49.7 in September, and now it has increased back up to 54.0, showing growth in the local manufacturing sector and overall economy.”

Read the article at "New report contains generally good news for Inland Empire economy."

The line between what is just offensive and what is a harbinger of specific danger has become hazier,’ CSUSB professor says
Nov. 6, 2019
The Philadelphia Inquirer

In an age where mass shooters routinely post hate-filled manifestos online before their attacks, the line between what is just offensive and what is a harbinger of specific danger has become hazier, said Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino.

“I certainly think authorities have a defensible claim for [detaining] someone allegedly from an extremist organization who has a cache of weapons,” Levin said, after reviewing Fred C. Arena’s case, an avowed white supremacist and internet troll from Salem, New Jersey, who boasted of past successes doxing and haranguing a rival until “he wanted to kill himself.” He was charged with lying to the FBI about his ties to white nationalist groups.

Read the article at "Philadelphia Navy Yard worker and accused white supremacist too dangerous for bail, judge says."

CSUSB professor and report cited in article about recent hate crime in Milwaukee
Daily Mail/The Associated Press
Nov. 5, 2019

Brian Levin, criminal justice professor and director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at CSUSB, and the center’s report were mentioned in an article about a recent attack involving a 61-year-old white man being accused of throwing battery acid on a Hispanic man’s face in Milwaukee.

According to the article, Levin released a study in July that found a 9 percent increase in hate crimes reported to police in major U.S. cities in 2018. 

Levin found a modest decrease in bias crimes against Hispanic or Latino people – from 103 in 2017 to 100 in 2018 – in 10 major cities, including New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. However, Levin has said the totals likely would have increased last year if not for an unexplained drop in anti-Hispanic bias crimes reported for Phoenix, from 25 in 2017 to 10 in 2018. 

Read the article at 'White man, 61, accused of throwing battery acid on the face of a Hispanic US citizen in Milwaukee is a Marine veteran who once held four hunters at gunpoint on his Wisconsin property.'

These news clips and others may be found at “In the Headlines” at inside.csusb.edu.


TAGS:David Yaghoubian, history, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Iran, Trump administration, Institute of Applied Research, Institute of Applied Research and Policy Analysis, Jack H. Brown College of Business and Public Administration, Barbara Sirotnik, information and decision sciences, Lori Aldana, PMI, Purchasing Managers Index, Brian Levin, criminal justice, hate crime, Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, white nationalist, white supremacy, racism

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