We Define the Future

Faculty in the News, Nov. 25

NOTE: Faculty, if you are interviewed and quoted by news media, or if your work has been cited, and you have an online link to the article or video, please let us know. Contact us at news@csusb.edu  


CSUSB professor comments on latest report on firearm deaths in California
The Orange County Register/Southern California News Group
Nov. 24, 2019
 
Brian Levin, director for the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State San Bernardino, was quoted in an article about deaths by firearms in California.
 
In counties like Riverside and San Bernardino, where the number of gun deaths has risen even as per-capita death rates have fallen, statistics can be cold comfort.
 
“Even when an increase in homicides is outpaced by a city’s population growth, it can nonetheless feel as if crime is getting substantially worse,” said Levin, a professor of criminal justice.
 
“Homicides are the most vividly reported and deeply feared of all crimes.”
 
Coastal Los Angeles and Orange counties are generally more densely populated and heavily policed, and likely have more officers assigned to weapons enforcement than the inland counties, Levin said.
 
The newspaper reported: “Total deaths from firearms has climbed 5.6% in the Golden State since 1999, but that increase has been far slower than population growth and far from uniform across Southern California.
 
“Carnage grew more rapidly in the inland counties — by 18.7% in Riverside and 11.1% in San Bernardino — while it plunged nearly 30% in Los Angeles and dipped 4% in Orange.”
 
Read the complete article at “Gun deaths up in state, but Southern California figures vary widely in the past 2 decades.”

CSUSB professor writes on what influenced him to be an activist for Ethiopia
ZeHabesha
Nov. 23, 2019
 
Alemayehu G. Mariam, professor of political science, emeritus, wrote in his weekly column: “For years, I have memorialized the month of November by remembering the hundreds of innocent Ethiopians who lost their lives or were maimed and disfigured in the Meles Massacres of 2005.
 
“Indeed, I joined the Ethiopian human rights movement in 2005 ONLY because of the Meles Massacres. Prior to that time, my interest in Ethiopia was purely academic.”
 
Read the complete column at “Ethiopia: I Remember the Slaughter of November 2005 in 2019!

These news clips and others may be found at “In the Headlines” at inside.csusb.edu.
 


TAGS:Brian Levin, crime, criminal justice, Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, guns, firearms, homicides, report, California, Al Mariam, Alemayehu G. Mariam, Ethiopia, human rights, political science, politics, prime minister, Abiy Ahmed, Nobel Peace Prize, Diasporia Trust Fund Advisory Council, Ethiopians in Diaspora, Ethiopian Diaspora Trust Fund, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Top Stories

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