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Faculty in the News, Nov. 18

NOTE: Faculty, if you are interviewed and quoted by news media, or if your work has been cited, and you have an online link to the article or video, please let us know. Contact us at news@csusb.edu.


CSUSB professor discusses Mike Pompeo’s statement of solidarity with Iranians
Press TV
Nov. 17, 2019

CSUSB history professor David Yaghoubian joined Michael Springmann, American writer and former diplomat, to discuss United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s statement of solidarity with Iranians protesting new gas prices.

“Without exaggeration, Pompeo’s statement truly is one of the most disingenuous statements I have probably ever heard because this is Mike Pompeo, the American secretary of state, who is a primary architect and cheerleader of the so-called maximum pressure campaign of economic terrorism against the people of Iran,” Yaghoubian said during the interview.

Watch the segment at "Iran: Pompeo sympathizing with people who are under pressure of U.S. economic terrorism."

CSUSB professor weighs in on rise of hate crimes in the U.S.
Fars News Agency (Iran)
Nov. 14, 2019

Brian Levin, CSUSB criminal justice professor and director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, was quoted in an article about the rise of violent hate crimes in the United States.

“Homicides were up and crimes against persons were up and that’s an important thing to look at,” Levin said.

The spikes in incidents have consistently connected to political attacks against specific marginalized groups in recent years, he said.

“We’re seeing the swapping of one derided group in the social-political arena for another,” he noted, adding, “Attacks against Muslims peaked around 2016 when terrorism was the concern. Now immigration is the No. 1 issue and Latinos are being targeted.”

“We’re having a democratisation of hate,” Levin said, adding, “There is a reshuffling in who is being targeted.”

Read the complete article at "FBI Reports: Violent Hate Crimes in US Reach Highest Levels in 16 Years."

CSUSB professor discusses latest hate crime report by FBI
MSN
Nov. 15, 2019

In an article about the FBI’s recent report on hate crimes, Brian Levin, CSUSB criminal justice professor and director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, shares his expertise.

Nationally, there has been a “reshuffling” of which populations are targeted that mirrors shifts in political discourse, said Levin. Accordingly, he said, anti-Muslim and anti-Arab crimes have decreased, while Latino, immigrant and transgender communities see spikes.

“I think what we’ve been seeing is a swapping of who is now considered a legitimate target of aggression in our socio-political climate,” Levin said. “Just as we were seeing that decline of anti-Muslim crime, we saw ... an increase of attacks against Latinos.”

Levin sees an alarming pattern in the national figures on serious crimes against people, like assault and intimidation, which rose to 4,571 — a 16-year high — and accounted for more than two-thirds of last year’s hate crimes.

Hate-motivated killings climbed from 15 in 2017 to 24 in 2018, which included 11 people slain in a mass shooting in a Pittsburgh synagogue.

“An upward trend in violent crime is a cause for concern,” Levin said.

Read the complete article at "FBI: Hate crimes rose 58% in San Francisco as nationwide numbers leveled off."

CSUSB professor quoted in article about hate crimes against Sikhs
India Abroad
Nov. 16, 2019
According to an NPR report, the main concern for extremism trackers is the rising level of violence — the report showed an increase in the number of “crimes against persons,” such as intimidation, assault and homicide.

“We're seeing a leaner and meaner type of hate crime going on,” it quoted Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University San Bernardino, as saying “Homicides were up and crimes against persons were up and that's an important thing to look at,” he said.

Read the complete article at "Sikhs faced the third largest number of hate crimes in 2018, FBI data shows."

‘Better incentives for agencies to report to the FBI are key,’ says CSUSB professor
MSN
Nov. 15, 2019
report made public Wednesday by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights called on Congress to adopt legislation that would use funding to incentivize police departments across the country to produce annual accountings of hate crimes. The commission also recommended that the police departments establish dedicated hate crime units aimed at better identifying and investigating reports of those incidents.

Brian Levin, a former NYPD officer and the director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, told ProPublica, a nonprofit newsroom based in New York, that better incentives for agencies to report to the FBI are key. Making training and policy standards contingent on funding could help, he said, as could expanding resources and personnel.

Read the complete article at "Police Don’t Do a Good Job Tracking Hate Crimes. A New Report Calls on Congress to Take Action."

These news clips and others may be found at “In the Headlines” at inside.csusb.edu.
 


TAGS:College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, history, David Yaghoubian, Mike Pompeo, Iran, gas prices, secretary of state, Brian Levin, Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, criminal justice, hate crimes, police, Top Stories

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