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Faculty in the News, Nov. 14

NOTE: Faculty, if you are interviewed and quoted by news media, or if your work has been cited, and you have an online link to the article or video, please let us know. Contact us at news@csusb.edu.


Spotlighting sustainability: CSUSB radio show puts the focus on sustainability
BizEd
Nov. 1, 2018
 
How can a business school connect with stakeholders on issues it considers critical? At California State University in San Bernardino (CSUSB), one way the Jack H. Brown College of Business and Public Administration (JHBC) meets this goal is through a radio program devoted to global and local sustainability issues.
 
The show is the brainchild of Breena Coates, emeritus professor of corporate strategy, and was developed with the input of dean Lawrence Rose. 
 
Read the complete article at “Spotlighting sustainability: CSUSB radio show puts the focus on sustainability.”

Latest hate crime report represents ‘a raft of bad news,’ CSUSB professor says
Newsweek
Nov. 13, 2018
 
Hate crimes rose for a third straight year, increasing 17 percent in 2017, according to FBI data released Tuesday.
 
Law enforcement found 7,175 hate crimes involving 8,437 offenses last year, a significant rise from the 6,121 recorded in 2016. The percent increase was the largest in 10 years and the third-largest proportional rise since the FBI began collecting robust data on hate crimes in the early 1990s, Brian Levin, the director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, told Newsweek. 
 
Levin said the figures represented a "historic increase" and represented a "raft of bad news."
And while approximately 1,000 more law enforcement agencies contributed statistics to the FBI report, Levin said this did not entirely account for the higher figures reported.
 
"This is an inflection point that cannot simply be explained away on the increase in agencies," he said
 
Read the complete article at “Hate crimes increase 17 percent in 2017, rising for third straight year: anti-Semitism, anti-black bias prevalent.”

CSUSB professor says FBI hate crime report shows ‘historic increase’
BuzzFeed.News
Nov. 13, 2018
 
In President Donald Trump’s first year in office, the number of reported hate crimes jumped 17 percent — the highest climb in more than a decade — according to 2017 numbers released Tuesday by the FBI.
 
Hate crime experts say the report’s value is not as a meticulous count, but as a reliable barometer of trends. And the trend that emerged from the 2017 numbers is chilling, said longtime hate tracker Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino.
 
“This is a historic increase, and it has to be recognized as such. It can’t be explained away by increased reporting,” Levin said. “We’re at a new plateau."
 
Levin said there was a roughly 14 percent rise in anti-Jewish attacks even without the bomb threats, a number that reflects the alarm US Jewish groups have been sounding as they report increased hostility, such as vandalized cemeteries and synagogues. Then came the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting, in which a suspect with a history of hateful comments about Jews and other minorities killed 11 people and injured seven in the deadliest attack on the Jewish community in US history. That attack occurred last month, so it’s not included in the 2017 figures.
 
Read the complete article at “Hate crimes jumped 17 percent during Donald Trump’s first year in office, according to the FBI.”

Latest hate crime report indicates ‘emboldening of white nationalism in public and virtual spaces,’ CSUSB professor says
The Orange County Register/Southern California News Group
Nov. 13, 2018
 
Hate crimes nationwide sharply increased by 17 percent in 2017, according to an FBI report, marking the third consecutive year such incidents fueled by prejudice have risen in an environment of political polarization.
 
This year, around 1,000 more law enforcement agencies participated in hate crime reporting. But that alone cannot be attributed to the double-digit spike in hate crimes nationwide, said Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State San Bernardino.
 
“This is a rise that is so significant that we can’t simply attribute it to better or more efficient reporting,” he said.
 
He attributes the increase to a number of factors including the rise in white nationalism, a decline of trust in institutions such as government, schools and the media, and the lack of political leadership in condemning the rise of hatred.
 
“What is most worrisome is the emboldening of white nationalism in public and virtual spaces,” Levin said.
 
Read the complete article at “Hate crimes rise 17 percent in FBI report that shows 3-year trend.”

Hate crime spike from November 2016 dropped, but plateaued ‘at a higher level,’ CSUSB professor says
San Francisco Chronicle
Nov. 13, 2018
 
U.S. hate crimes increased by 17 percent last year, federal officials said Tuesday, a surge driven by racial and anti-Semitic attacks and linked by some experts to the wider public emergence of white supremacists and other hate groups. Across the country, authorities reported 7,175 hate crimes in 2017, compared with 6,121 in 2016 — the number rising for the third consecutive year. In California, law enforcement agencies said 1,095 crimes last year were motivated by a victim’s race, ethnicity, ancestry, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity or disability.
 
Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University San Bernardino, said the rise in hate crimes can’t be attributed to one person, but he did note the trend since President Trump was elected in November 2016.
 
“What I think we saw was this precipitous spike around election time. It then moderated,” Levin said. “But when it plateaued back down, it was at a higher level.”
 
Read the complete article at “FBI: Hate crimes in U.S., CA surge in first year of Trump’s presidency.”

CSUSB criminal justice professor comments on increase in hate crimes tracked by FBI
VT Digger (Vermont)
Nov. 13, 2018
 
Hate crime incidents reported by law enforcement agencies in Vermont is at the highest level since 1995, the earliest year for which Federal Bureau of Investigations statistics are available, according to a report released Tuesday.
 
Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, attributed the rise in incidents to a lack of leadership from President Donald Trump.
 
“There is a line that wouldn’t be crossed with regards to over-the-top bigotry, which apparently no longer exists,” Levin said.
 
Read the complete article at “Reported hate crime incidents reach 23-year high in Vermont.”

CSUSB professor comments on FBI hate crime report
NewsAmericas
Nov. 13, 2018
 
Should Caribbean immigrants and Caribbean Americans in the United States, many of whom are black, be more worried, in light of the latest FBI Hate Crimes report? The agency on Tuesday said White hate crimes across the USA is growing steadily, with more whites committing racial attacks in 2017 than any other race group.
 
Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism and a professor of criminal justice at California State University, San Bernardino, said a lack of national leadership on the issue of hate crimes appears to be a factor in the increase.
 
Read the complete article at “Worrying trend for Caribbean immigrants? – white hate on the rise for third year in a row – FBI.”

California ‘a cornucopia of extremism on all sides,’ CSUSB professor says
Placerville Newswire
Nov. 13, 2018
 
What is it that makes a progressive state like California such a hotbed for racism? That’s a question explored last year in an article co-published by Capital and Main and Newsweek. 
 
“California has been a cornucopia of extremism on all sides of the political spectrum,” Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, was quoted as saying. “It’s the place where you can come from anywhere and define your own American Dream, and everybody’s got a gripe. The fringes are as hot here as they are anywhere.”
 
Read the complete article at “California remains a hotbed for white nationalism.”

These news clips and others may be found at “In the Headlines” at inside.csusb.edu.


TAGS:Sustainability, Sustainability Show, Breena E. Coates, Coyote Radio, radio, economics, environment, business, corporate responsibility, Jack H. Brown College of Business and Public Administration, United Nations Global Compact, PRME, (Principles for Responsible Management Education, community, Brian Levin, criminal justice, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, extremism, study, hate crime, FBI, report, law enforcement, Top Stories

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