Faculty in the News: The need for cybersecurity experts, and comments on mass shootings

Media Inquiries

CSUSB professor Tony Coulson comments on the growth of cybersecurity and need of experts

http://www.newswise.com/articles/so-you-want-to-be-a-cybersecurity-expert

Newswise

Nov. 7, 2017

Not so long ago, cybersecurity was the domain of science and engineering. Today, it folds in science, engineering, business, public policy, intelligence and criminal justice, making it an interdisciplinary area, says Tony Coulson, Ph.D., professor of information and decision sciences at California State University, San Bernardino and director of the campus' Cyber Security Center.

“According to a study by Corps Information Systems Control Officer, or CISCO, we need one million cyber experts,” Dr. Coulson says. “That is an absurd number. If we said we were short one million police or firefighters, it would be a national crisis. In cyber, it is [a crisis]. The economy is based on e-commerce and there are just so many vulnerabilities.”

On the Cal State San Bernardino campus, the NICE Challenges system “provides a means for cyber students to test their skills and demonstrate their ability to think like the adversary (such as hackers),” says Dr. Coulson. “We give the students the workforce experience before the workforce.”

 

CSUSB Professor Brian Levin: To stop mass shootings we must prevent unstable Americans from access to military style firearms

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/stop-unstable-americans-access-military-firearms-article-1.3614747

NY Daily News

Nov. 6, 2017

CSUSB professor and director of the Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism, Brian Levin, wrote an article about the need to prevent unstable Americans from gaining access to military style firearms:

“If the increasing string of mega-fatality mass shootings shows us anything, it is that preventing unstable people from having immediate access to military style firearms, ammo and magazines and stocks capable of rapidly firing hundreds of rounds in short durations, while not a panacea, can be effective. New York and New Jersey’s gun laws left last week’s Manhattan terrorist with only a truck and mere gun replica’s to wreak his carnage.”

Brian Levin is also featured on Fox News Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlj3NAP0960

https://twitter.com/FoxNews/statuses/927363480247783424

 

CSUSB Professor Brian Levin comments on Trump’s reaction to recent NYC attack

https://www.voanews.com/a/donald-trump-immigration-lottery-new-york-attack-calls-us-justice-joke/4095757.html

Voice of America

Nov. 2, 2017

Following the NYC attack on Oct. 31, President Trump said he wants to immediately work with Congress to abolish the immigration lottery that allowed the suspect, Sayfullo Saipov, to enter the United States.

Brian Levin, a professor of criminal justice and director for the Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism at California State University, said it is good to reassess policies, but that he worries that process can result in a response based on bias instead of facts.

“What we have to understand is our problem is more so radicalization, not necessarily immigration, because we have people who are converts or who are unstable that are being radicalized by social media or peer group members, and that’s a problem that making a reflexive response with regard to immigration simply isn’t going to resolve,” he told VOA.

Levin said there should be a focus on scrubbing the internet of extremist content, and that while vetting is necessary, that screening should not single out religion in a way that goes against the country's values of religious pluralism.

Brian Levin is also featured on CNN:

https://twitter.com/CNNNewsroomLA/status/926165728058687488

https://twitter.com/CNNNewsroomLA/status/926157884882161664


TAGS:cybersecurity, Cyber Security Center, Tony Coulson, CSUSB, Jack H. Brown College of Business and Public Administration, Information & Decision Sciences, Brian Levin, criminal justice, Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, terrorism, hate

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