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Faculty in the News, March 5

NOTE: Faculty, if you are interviewed and quoted by news media, or if your work has been cited, and you have an online link to the article or video, please let us know. Contact us at news@csusb.edu.   


CSUSB biology professor to participate in panel discussion about Henrietta Lacks and biological and ethical ramifications of gene research
Precinct Reporter
March 5, 2019
 
Michael Chao, chair of the CSUSB Department of Biology, will join speakers from Loma Linda University for a panel discussion on the book, “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” at the San Bernardino Public Library at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, March 6.
 
The panel will discuss the biological and ethical ramifications of gene research and what happened to Henrietta Lacks, a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more.
 
Read the complete article at “‘The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,’ panel discussion.”

CSUSB Report: manufacturing index drops slightly but is still solid
The Press-Enterprise/The Sun/Redlands Daily Facts/Daily Bulletin
March 4, 2019
 
The Purchasing Managers Index, the survey of 30 factory executives in San Bernardino and Riverside counties, fell to 53.9 last month from 55.3 in January, according to the Institute of Applied Research at Cal State San Bernardino. A score above 50 indicates expansion in the sector, which has been the case for 26 consecutive months.
 
However, two key measures, gauging the level of production and the number of new orders, declined in February. The index for new orders fell to 46.4, the first time it’s been below 50 in more than a year. Production fell from 58.3 to 55.4.
 
Barbara Sirotnik, director of the CSUSB institute, said in her analysis that these declines so far are not a concern because it takes three months of negative numbers before economists consider it a downward trend.
 
A positive note in February’s report is the employment index, which jumped to 53.6 from 46.7 the previous month. January had been the first time below 50 for the employment index in two years. Just under 100,000 Inland Empire residents work in manufacturing jobs, according to the most recent state data.
 
“It appears that last month’s figure may have been an anomaly,” Sirotnik wrote.
 
Read the complete article at “Manufacturing index drops slightly but is still solid.”

CSUSB professor part of panel discussing Utah bill to strengthen its hate crime law
RadioWest/KUER (NPR Salt Lake City, Utah)
March 4, 2019
 
Brian Levin, professor of criminal justice and the director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, was one of the panelists on the public radio station’s RadioWest program to discuss a bill in the Utah legislature that would strengthen the state’s hate crime law. Utah’s Senate Bill 103 aims to boost the penalties for crimes that target victims because of their race, religion, sex, and other attributes. 
 
Listen to the program at “How should Utah punish hate?”

CSUSB professor weighs in on anti-Semitic photo of California high school students
The Orange County Register/The Mercury News
March 4, 2019
 
A photo of a group of California students flashing the Nazi salute while surrounding a swastika formed by red plastic cups has shocked the Newport Beach community, Jewish leaders and others. 
 
The students’ photo is a reminder of “how mainstreamed the swastika and the Hitler salute have become,” said Brian Levin, professor of criminal justice and director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State San Bernardino.
 
“This is the kind of image I’m used to seeing when I’m looking at gatherings of violent skinheads, not high school students in one of the most acclaimed school districts in the country,” he said. “This should be a teachable moment.”
 
There is “nothing accidental” about the photo, Levin said.
 
“This is not an accidental or impulsive expression of bigotry,” he said. “This was premeditated based on the group of people, the Hitler salute and the carefully arranged cups. These folks knew there was a chance this image could get out. But, there is obviously no compunction whatsoever.”
 
Read the complete article at “Students seen in photo on social media flashing Nazi salute around swastika formed with cups.”

‘This is not accidental’ says CSUSB professor regarding viral anti-Semitic photo of teenagers
Newsweek
March 4, 2019
 
Police in Orange County are investigating an anti-Semitic image of a group of teenagers at a party that has gone viral and sparked deep concern among community leaders.
 
Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State San Bernardino, told the OC Register: “This is the kind of image I’m used to seeing when I’m looking at gatherings of violent skinheads, not high school students in one of the most acclaimed school districts in the country.
 
“This is not an accidental or impulsive expression of bigotry. This was premeditated based on the group of people, the Hitler salute and the carefully arranged cups. These folks knew there was a chance this image could get out. But, there is obviously no compunction whatsoever.”
 
Read the complete article at  “O.C. high school students spark outrage by making swastika from cups and giving Nazi salute.

​​​​​​CSUSB professor discusses Trump administration proposal to transfer nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia
Press TV
March 1, 2019
 
David Yaghoubian, CSUSB professor of history, was interviewed for a segment on a proposal by the Trump administration to transfer nuclear power technology to Saudi Arabia. U.S. lawmakers are debating a bill that would ensure Congressional oversight of any civilian nuclear cooperation between the two countries. This follows a report by a House of Representatives oversight committee that said several administration appointees have promoted the plan while having strong private commercial interests in it.
 
Among the related topics, Yaghoubian was asked to react to a comment by U.S. Rep. Brad Sherman (D-Calif.) that “A country that can’t be trusted with a bone saw shouldn’t be trusted with nuclear weapons,” a reference to the death of journalist Jamal Khasshogi. 
 
Yaghoubian said, “I think that is patently obvious, but I also think it’s interesting that Representative Sherman is just focusing on the bonesaw and the murder of journalist Jamal Khasshogi. The Saudis have had a multi-decade long track record of supporting Takfiri terrorism and destabilization of the region to advance their Wahhabi ideology, and as well, have played a major role in the continued advancement of the American military-industrial complex.”
 
Watch the segment at “U.S. Congress debates bill to check Saudi nuclear deal.”

These news clips and others may be found at “In the Headlines” at inside.csusb.edu.
 


TAGS:Michael Chao, biology, College of Natural Sciences, Henrietta Lacks, ethics, gene research, community, San Bernardino Public Library, Brian Levin, criminal justice, Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, hate crime, politics, religion, race, extremism, Utah, legislature, bill, law, Nazi, students, history, David Yaghoubian, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Donald Trump, Saudi Arabia, nuclear, business, economy, Inland Empire, Institute of Applied Research, Jack H. Brown College of Business and Public Administration, manufacturing, Purchasing Managers Index, Barbara Sirotnik, Top Stories

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