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Faculty in the News, March 13

NOTE: Faculty, if you are interviewed and quoted by news media, or if your work has been cited, and you have an online link to the article or video, please let us know. Contact us at news@csusb.edu.   


Shock value may be one motivation why the Nazi swastika are gaining interest among some teens, CSUSB professor says
Forward
March 11, 2019
 
Brian Levin, the director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, was interviewed for an article about the Nazi swastika becoming a trendy object among teenagers.
 
Levin said he was seeing a “swastika renaissance.” Incidents of high schoolers parroting Nazi imagery for laughs have been increasing around the country. Experts say the trend is driven by teens’ desires for validation, especially on social media – where many are also exposed to extremism and hatred. Ironically, Levin explained, the symbol has been “picked up by upper-middle-class white kids” hoping to take advantage of its shock value even as white nationalist groups have abandoned it in a bid to gain mainstream acceptability.
 
Read the complete article at “It’s not your imagination. The Nazi swastika is trendy — among teens.”

CSUSB professor interviewed about another alleged incident over the wearing of a MAGA hat
Newsweek
March 12, 2019
 
An article about a woman who said she was attacked for wearing a “Make America Great Again” hat in support of President Trump and not taken seriously by police included a comment from CSUSB’s expert on hate crimes and extremism.
 
There has been a rise in alleged criminal acts against people wearing Trump MAGA hats,  Brian Levin, the director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, told Newsweek. 

“We have a polarized, racially, political infused landscape—this kind of conflict now bleeds over,” Levin said.
 
Read the complete article at “Woman says she was 'viciously attacked' for wearing MAGA hat, claims police 'showed bias.'

These news clips and others may be found at “In the Headlines” at inside.csusb.edu.


TAGS:Brian Levin, criminal justice, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, hate crime, politics, religion, race, extremism, white nationalists, MAGA, Donald Trump, Top Stories

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