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Faculty in the News, June 24

NOTE: Faculty, if you are interviewed and quoted by news media, or if your work has been cited, and you have an online link to the article or video, please let us know. Contact us at news@csusb.edu  


Idea of ‘areas of convergence’ between Islamist militancy and Nazism used in a federal court case discussed by CSUSB professor
WHSV TV (Harrisonburg, Va.)
June 21, 2019
 
Brian Levin, director at the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, was interviewed for an article about a former Washington, D.C., Metrorail police officer who was convicted in federal court of aiding ISIS by purchasing $200 gift cards.  Nicholas Young of Fairfax, Va., was sentenced to 15 years last year for obstruction of justice and attempting to provide support to a terrorist group.
 
During his trial, the jury was shown a photo of Young wearing a Nazi uniform and three dozen other Nazi artifacts and photos.  A counter-terrorism analyst testifying for prosecutors said there are "areas of convergence" between Islamist militancy and Nazism" based on a mutual hatred of Jews. "For some individuals who have embraced both Nazism and militant Islamism, the two movements' contempt for Jews is of utmost importance, and allows them to overlook incongruent aspects of Nazi and jihadist ideology," prosecutors wrote.
 
This "convergence" theory, while unusual, is not unheard of, said Levin.
 
Levin said the 4th Circuit will have to decide whether the Nazi imagery and artifacts offered evidence of Young's alleged crimes.
 
"There is a place where these two generally oppositional ideologies have met through certain individuals. The key here is how relevant is Mr. Young's potpourri of extremism relevant to the crime charged?" Levin said.
 
Read the complete article at “Ex-police officer again gets 15 years on terror conviction.”

Trump halting planned strike against Iran ‘part of the psychological warfare campaign’ his administration is waging, CSUSB professor says
Press TV
June 22, 2019
 
In the aftermath of U.S. President Donald Trump calling off an attack on Iran in retaliation for it shooting down an unmanned U.S. military drone last week, the newscast interviewed David Yaghoubian, CSUSB professor of history, for his analysis in the latest development in the rising tensions between the two countries. Trump said he was in no hurry to strike Iran, and also said he was open to talks with Iran with no preconditions.
 
“In relation to the issue of talks with no preconditions, he (Trump) would definitely need to elaborate further on what that means,” Yaghoubian said, “because if he’s willing to stand in front of cameras and tear up the absurd 12-point list of maximalist demands for Iran to give up its total sovereignty and rights, and returns to the JCPOA (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action), and therefore there would not be pressure, illegal pressure under international law and under (United Nations) resolutions,  then I believe there might be some area for fruitful dialogue on areas of mutual interest.
 
“But short of that, I don’t know what this means,” he said.
 
As for Trump calling off the missile strike, Yaghoubian said, “I believe that is simply part of the psychological warfare campaign that the Trump administration is continuing to try to wage, and it’s unsuccessful.”
 
Tensions have grown since last year when the Trump administration pulled the U.S. out of the JCPOA, the multinational agreement to regulate Iran’s nuclear program, and reinstated economic sanctions. The administration has said it wants to negotiate a better deal that the existing one and using the sanctions to get Iran back to the negotiating table; Iran has said such steps won’t work.
 
Watch the segment online at “Trump says in no hurry to strike Iran.”
 
Press TV is a 24-hour English language news and documentary network affiliated with Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting.

CSUSB professor discusses rising tensions between U.S. and Iran in aftermath of a U.S. drone being shot down
TRT World Now (Turkey)
June 21, 2019
 
David Yaghoubian, CSUSB professor of history, was interviewed for a segment about the downing of a U.S. drone by Iran and the increasing tensions between the two countries. The unmanned U.S. military aircraft was shot down on June 20; the two countries are disputing whether the drone was in international airspace or Iranian airspace.
 
Tensions have grown since last year when the Trump administration pulled the U.S. out of the multinational agreement to regulate Iran’s nuclear program, and reinstated economic sanctions. The administration has said it wants to negotiate a better deal that the existing one and using the sanctions to get Iran back to the negotiating table; Iran has said such steps won’t work.
 
“Iran is going to stand up for its sovereignty and its rights, and so I believe the ball is back in the Trump administration’s court,” Yaghoubian said. “Iran will not be cowed, it will not be bullied. And so we are essentially, in real time, witnessing what happens when finally the bluff of the empire is called by a nation that refuses to capitulate to demands that are illegal under international law and the United Nations charter.”
 
See the complete interview at “US/Iran Tensions
 
TRT is a Turkish public broadcast service.

These news clips  and others may be viewed at “In the Headlines” at inside.csusb.edu.
 


TAGS:history, David Yaghoubian, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Donald Trump, Iran, military, JCPOA, nuclear, Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, drone, Brian Levin, crime, criminal justice, hate crime, Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, federal court, terrorism, law enforcement, Nazism, jihadist, ISIS, Top Stories

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