We Define the Future

Faculty in the News, July 15

NOTE: Faculty, if you are interviewed and quoted by news media, or if your work has been cited, and you have an online link to the article or video, please let us know. Contact us at news@csusb.edu  


CSUSB professor Sally McGill interviewed about one of her former geology student’s visit to quake epicenter
Fontana Herald News
July 13, 2019
 
The July 4 and July 5 earthquakes near the desert communities of Ridgecrest and Trona shocked and frightened hundreds of thousands of people across California.
 
For Bryan Castillo -- or “Earthquake_Dude” on Twitter -- the opportunity to see the aftermath firsthand was like going to Disneyland.
The Cal State San Bernardino Department of Geological Sciences alumnus and earthquake geologist spent two days near the two desert communities, along Highway 178, to collect scientific data of the largest temblor to hit the Golden State in 20 years. While he has been studying earthquakes for years -- his master’s thesis was on a portion of the San Andreas Fault – the recent big shake-ups were his first chance to study the aftermath of one in the field.
 
Sally McGill, CSUSB geological sciences professor, was also quoted in the article.
 
“Bryan Castillo has been an enthusiastic student of earthquakes since I first met him about three years ago,” McGill said. “His master’s thesis work provided the first information ever available on the timing and frequency of large, prehistoric earthquakes on a southern portion of the San Andreas fault. After studying sedimentary layers offset by prehistoric earthquakes, as exposed in a trench across the San Andreas fault, I am so glad that Bryan has now had the opportunity to contribute to mapping and documenting the surface rupture of a major earthquake while it is still fresh.”

James L. Mulvihill, CSUSB professor emeritus and San Bernardino City Council member, discusses state grant to help city update its general plan
The Sun/The Press-Enterprise
July 11, 2019
 
James L. Mulvihill, CSUSB professor emeritus, geography and environmental studies, and currently a San Bernardino City Council member, was interviewed for an article about the city receiving state funds to update its general plan for development.
 
General plans lay out a city’s long-term goals, short-term objectives and policies to realize the two, and while they look 20 years into the future, it’s best to update them every five to 10 years.
 
“The point of having a modern, up-to-date general plan is developers look at it,” said Mulvihill, a longtime city planning professor at CSUSB. “A city knows what it wants, knows the direction it wants to take. In the planning department, building and safety, people making every day decisions, how do they know in the long run that their decisions are the right ones?
 
“Are they making ad-hoc decisions day after day after day? A general plan, in this sense, provides what the future will be in this particular timeframe.”
 
Read the complete article at “$3 million in state budget to help San Bernardino update general plan, attract new investment.”

CSUSB art professor serves as judge on glassblowing competition show on Netflix
July 11, 2019
Highland Community News
 
The community newspaper published an article about the competition show “Blown Away,” featuring Cal State San Bernardino’s art professor Katherine Gray as a judge before it began screening on Netflix on July 12.
 
The show, which originally aired in Canada, is hosted by pop-science YouTuber Nick Uhas, who has also appeared on “America’s Got Talent” and “Big Brother.” It features 10 master artisans who are given an art or design challenge each episode, with one contestant eliminated each time. The contestants came from across the United States and Canada.
 
Read the complete article at “CSUSB art professor serves as judge on glassblowing competition show on Netflix.”

Research by CSUSB economics professor on inheritance tax cited by financial news website in India
Mint (India)
 
The financial news website published an opinion piece that cited the research of Rishabh Kumar, CSUSB assistant professor of economics. The article focused on the idea of instituting an inheritance tax in India.
 
“A recent working paper from the World Inequality Lab, authored by Rishabh Kumar, shows that the wealth-income ratios in the India of the 21st century are approaching the same disproportionate size that was seen during sharp economic downturns in interwar colonial India,” the article said.
 
Read the complete article at “Opinion | The inheritance tax is an idea whose time has come.”

Alemayehu G. Mariam, CSUSB professor emeritus, calls on Ethiopians to get involved in their homeland’s progress
EthioSun
July 15, 2019
 
In his column, Alemayehu G. Mariam, CSUSB professor emeritus of political science, wrote: “There is great wisdom in the old typing drill, ‘This is the time for all good men and women to come to the aid of their country.’
 
“I would argue more specifically this is the time for all good Ethiopian lawyers, doctors, engineers, professors, academics, writers, journalists, teachers, service workers and all others to come to the aid of their country.”
 
Read the complete article at “Time for all good Ethiopians to come to the aid of their country! By Prof. Al Mariam.”

These news clips  and others may be viewed at “In the Headlines” at inside.csusb.edu.
 
 


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