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CSUSB faculty expertise highlighted in news coverage of U.S. military in Syria, the latest hate crime statistics and Southern California’s real estate market

NOTE: Faculty, if you are interviewed and quoted by news media, or if your work has been cited, and you have an online link to the article or video, please let us know. Contact us at news@csusb.edu.  

CSUSB professor interviewed on Russian official’s stance regarding U.S. keeping troops in Syria
Press TV (Iran)
Jan. 19, 2018

David Yaghoubian, CSUSB professor of history, was interviewed on Press TV on Jan. 19 regarding the Russian Foreign Minister’s statement on the announcement that the U.S. will be maintaining a troop presence in Syria. Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov has lashed out at the U.S. for undermining the territorial integrity of Syria through efforts to form “alternative bodies of authority” across the Middle Eastern country, Press TV reported.

The United States’ interest is in maintaining a presence of American troops around the globe, at a time when the U.S. is facing a “decompensation of a dying empire,” Yaghoubian said. The declining American power “cannot admit that it has been defeated anywhere and therefore doubles down on its actions and activities to spread its influence,” he said in the interview.

Press TV is a 24-hour English language news and documentary network affiliated with Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting.

See the complete video report at “US-backed force violates Syria sovereignty” and read the related news article, “US maintaining troops in Syria to spread influence: Analyst.”

Political divisions, making country more vulnerable to hate and extremism, play into increase in hate crimes, CSUSB professor says
The Orange County Register
Jan. 19, 2018

White supremacists and neo-Nazis were responsible for the largest number of domestic extremist killings in 2017 compared to other groups including Islamists and black nationalists, according to a report released by the Anti-Defamation League on Wednesday, Jan. 17

The annual report, titled “Murder and Extremism in the United States,” released by the league’s Center on Extremism, noted that of the 34 people killed by domestic terrorists in 2017, far-right extremists killed 20, with 18 of those killed by white supremacists.

Increased political divisions have left the country more vulnerable to extremism and hate, said Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State San Bernardino.

“We have a robust white nationalist movement at a time of socio-political instability,” he said. “You have to pay attention to the fact that the spread of white nationalism is far greater than jihadism.”

Also in 2017, large public demonstrations, including several in Southern California, were violent and confrontational, Levin said. He warned that in such an environment, violence of all stripes is probable.

“While white nationalism is the biggest ship that is rising in this tide, don’t take your eyes off the other ships like Islamism or black nationalism,” he said.

Read the complete report at “ADL report: White supremacists responsible for most extremist murders in U.S. in 2017.”

CSUSB economics department study cited in article on Southern California real estate market
The Real Deal
Jan. 19, 2018

The high demand is fueled by lack of inventory. San Bernardino County overall is grappling with residential overcrowding, reports show. A 2017 report by the CSUSB economic department was cited in a news article about the real estate market in Southern California.

In a January 2017 report compiled by the economics department of California State University, San Bernardino, the county ranked ninth highest in terms of residential overcrowding in the state.

The report also stated that between 2010 and 2016, San Bernardino had one of the lowest rates of new home construction in the state. Over the past several years, the county has constructed fewer than 2,000 new homes annually, according to the report, which noted that it would take seven years to meet current home ownership demand if the same rate of construction continues.

It attributed the slower building pace to “significant regulatory challenges at the federal, state and local levels.”

Not mentioned in the article, the report, “California Homeownership and Sociological Factors,” was written by CSUSB economics faculty members Daniel MacDonald and Yasemin Dildar. It was commissioned by the Building Industry Association of Southern California, Baldy View Chapter.

These news clips and others may be found at “In the Headlines” on the Inside CSUSB website.


TAGS:history, David Yaghoubian, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Iran, Syria, military, Russia, Brian Levin, hate crime, crime, criminal justice, Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, ADL, white supremacists, study, Anti-Defamation League, BIA, Building Industry Association of Southern California Baldy View Chapter, Carlos Rodriguez, community, Daniel MacDonald, economics, economy, education, faculty, health, homeownership, housing, research, Yasemin Dildar, Top Stories

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